Upgate Common

UpgateCommonCfissa230122-1

UpgateCommonCfissa230122-2

UpgateCommonLiverwort230122-1

Common Pouchwort (Calypogeia fissa)?

That was certainly the first thought but it seems possible that this is something else.

Notice the little tags on the edges of some of the leaves and the notches are certainly large for this species. I also couldn't find a central midrib as it was very connected to the substrate.

I will pass this one on to Mary.

UpgateCommonCobweb230122-1

UpgateCommonCobweb230122-2

In this photo the centre of the white circle is dead and the Cobweb duster is moving out from the centre.

UpgateCommonCobweb230122-3

UpgateCommonCobweb230122-4

Cobweb Duster (Athelia arachnoidea) A corticoid fungus that forms thin white cobwebby basidiocarps that is a parasite on lichens.

From Mushrooms of Russia

UpgateCommonCrust230122-1

Fungus Sp?

UpgateCommonCrust2230122-1

Fungus Sp

UpgateCommonDiscoSp230122-1

Disco community

UpgateCommonExidia230122-1

UpgateCommonExidia230122-2

UpgateCommonExidia230122-3

UpgateCommonExidia230122-4

UpgateCommonExidia230122-5

UpgateCommonExidia230122-6

Witches' Butter (Exidua Sp)

Possibly two different forms. The one a very dangly, gangly form, the other very closely adpressed to the branch. Both very close to each other.

One a very mature looking specimen with an almost velvet appearance on one side.

A head scratching mystery for further study.

UpgateCommonHedgehogSlug230122-4

Hedgehog Slug (Arion intermedius)

UpgateCommonLichen2230122-1

Lichen Sp?

UpgateCommonLichenSp230122-1

Lichen Sp

UpgateCommonMycena230122-1

Angel's Bonnet (Mycena arcangelica)

The cheilocystidia were of the pear form with lots of bristles - Hedgehogs

UpgateCommonPhlbia230122-1

Possibly a strange form of Wrinkled Crust (Phlebia radiata)?

from Anne

But I was stuck with the small spored toothed fungus that we thought looked a bit like a Phlebia on site and have just discovered it might be Hyphodontia quercina

UpgateCommonPin230122-1

A white pin type fungus on Alder ( Alnus glutinosa)

from Steve

The little white things on the dead and very decayed stump turned out to be Cudoniella acicularis - Oak Pin. Ascus, spores (many 1 septate) and paraphyses measured and all fitting nicely within the required parameters. (Fungi of Switzerland, Peter Thompson Ascomycetes and Fungi of Temperate Europe)

UpgateCommonPoroid230122-1

Poroid Fungus?

from Anne

The small honey comb-like resupinate that I was hoping would be a Trechispora was Ceriporia reticulata.

UpgateCommonQuercus230122-1

UpgateCommonYellowBrain230122-1

Yellow Brain (Tremella mesenterica)

From First Nature

Yellow Brain fungus grows on dead wood that has been attacked by wood-rotting fungi of the Peniophora genus. One of the most common Peniophora crust fungi in Britain and Ireland is Peniophora incanata, commonly known as Rosy Crust fungus. Very little or none of the Peniophora may be visible; this is because Tremella mesenterica feeds on the mycelium of the Peniophora fungus, and that can be deep inside the timber rather than on its surface. The fruiting body of the crust fungus does not even have to be present, therefore, and so it may look as though Yellow Brain is feeding directly on the host wood.
UpgateCommonYellowingCurtainCrust230122-1

UpgateCommonYellowingCurtainCrust230122-2

Yellowing Curtain Crust (Stereum subtomentosum)

UptonCommonMollisia230122-1

Mollisia Sp?

UpgateCommonTurkeyTail230122-1

UpgateCommonTurkeyTail230122-2

Turkey Tail

Possibly Ochre Bracket (Trametes ochraceae)

UpgateCommonToothed230122-1

UpgateCommonToothed230122-2

Could be one of two

Oak Tooth Crust (Radulomyces molaris) or Toothed Crust Fungus (Basidio radulum radula)

In this case it turned out to be Oak Tooth Crust

UpgateCommonSmokeyOysterling230122-1

Smoled Oysterling (Resupinatus applicatus)

UpgateCommonslimeMold230122-1

UpgateCommonSlimeMold2230122-1

UpgateCommonSlimeMold3230122-1

Slime Mold Species

UpgateCommonRosyCrust230122-1

UpgateCommonRosyCrust230122-2

Rosy Crust (Peniophora incarnata)

But no

From Tony

I thought that the orange crust (SJ took some too I think) might be Rosy Crust Peniophora incarnata but the spores were too small (5x3) & cystidia didn’t look right. In fact I couldn’t find any encrusted cystidia at all so perhaps not a Peniophora after all.

UpgateCommonCminutissima230122-1

x100

UpgateCommonCminutissima230122-2

x200

Minute Pouncewort (Cololejeunea minutissima)

This one was a lucky find as I've never seen it before. Tiny!

UpgateCommonNettle230122-1

Nettle Rash (Leptosphaeria acuta)

UpgateCommonwinterPolypore230122-1

Winter Polypore (Polyporus brumalis)

UpgateCommonWhite230122-1

Dewdrop Bonnet (Hemimycena tortuosa)

From Yvonne
The tiny white one in the log which we thought might be a Clitopilus was in fact Hemimycena tortuosa - it had a grown a bit by the time I looked at it and looked more like a normal agaric, then I found the spiral pileocystidia on the cap ( by accident actually - trying to get a bit of gill ! )

Thank you for a great day.

Comments

Cley

CleyMoon200122-1

CleyBTG210122-1

CleyBTG210122-2

CleyBTG210122-3

Black Tailed Godwit (Limosa limosa)

CleyLapwing210122-1

CleyLapwing210122-2

CleyLapwing210122-3

CleyLapwing210122-4

Lapwing (Vanellus vanellus)

CleyMarshHarrier210222-1

Marsh Harrier (Circus aeruginosus) in the morning light.

CleyMarshHarrier210122-2

CleyMarshHarrier210122-3

Marsh Harrier in the evening light.

About three thousand Pinkfeet graced the Cley fields this morning and then left to roost elsewhere later in the day.

Utterly stunning.

The photographs just scratch the surface of such sublime moments.

CleyPinkfoot210122-2

CleyPinkfoot210122-3

CleyPinkfoot210122-5

CleyPinkfoot210122-6

CleyPinkfoot210122-7

CleyPinkfoot210122-8

CleyPinkfoot210122-9

CleyPinkfoot210122-10

CleyPinkfoot210122-11

CleyPinkfoot210122-12

CleyPinkfoot210122-13

CleyPinkfoot210122-14

CleyPinkfoot210122-15

CleyPinkfoot210122-16

CleyPinkfoot210122-17

CleyPinkfoot210122-19

CleyPinkfoot210122-20

CleyPinkfoot210122-21

CleyPinkfoot210122-22

CleyPinkfoot210122-23

CleyPinkfoot210122-24

CleyPinkfoot210122-25

CleyPinkfoot210122-26

CleyPinkfoot210122-27

CleyPinkfoot210122-29

CleyPinkfoot210122-30

CleyPinkfoot210122-31

CleyPinkfoot210122-32

Pink Footed Goose (Anser brachyrhynchus)

CleyTeal210122-1

CleyTeal210122-3

CleyTeal210122-4

CleyTeal210122-5

CleyTeal210122-6

CleyTeal210122-7

Teal beginning to strut their stuff for the spring.

CleyTeal210122-8

CleyTeal210122-9

CleyTeal210122-10

Teal (Anas crecca)

CleyWigeon210222-1

Wigeon (Anas clypeata)


Comments

Winterton

WintertonCladonia190122-1

Lichen Sp

WintertonFdeltata190122-1

Dilated Scalewort (Frullenia dilatata)

WintertonGreyHairGrass190122-1

WintertonGreyHairGrass190122-2

Grey Hair-grass (Corynephorous canescens)

WintertonLichenSp190122-1

Lichen Sp?

WintertonLichenSp2190122-1

Lichen Sp?

WintertonOlyellii190122-1

Lyell's Bristle-moss (Orthotrichum lyellii)

A bit blurred as the wind was shaking the tree. But you can see the brown dust of the gemmae.

WintertonPciliaris190122-1

WintertonPciliaris190122-2

WintertonPciliaris190122-3

Ciliated Fringewort (Ptylidium ciliare)

WintertonSfimbriatum190122-1

Fringed Bog-moss (Sphagnum fimbriatum)

WintertonSpalustre190122-1

Blunt-leaved Bog-moss (Sphagnum palustre)

WintertonUbruchii190122-1

WintertonUbruchii190122-2

Bruch's Pincushion (Ulotta bruchii)

WintertonCbicuspiata190122-1

WintertonCcuspidata190122-3

WintertonCcuspidata190122-4

Perianths of Two-horned Pincerwort (Cepholozia bicuspidata)

WintertonGinflata190122-1

Inflated Notchwort (Gymnocolea inflata)

Comments

Kelling Heath

KellingHeath180122-1

Silver Birch (Betual pendula)

KellingHeathFdilatata180122-1

Dilated Scalewort (Frullania dilatata) with new growth.

KellingHeathFungus180122-1

KellingHeathFungus180122-2

KellingHeathFungus180122-3

Cushion Bracket (Phellinus pomaceus) on Blackthorn (Prunus spinosa)

KellingHeathLichenSp180122-1

Staghorn Lichen (Evernia prunastri)

KellingHeathMfurcata180122-1

Forked Veilwort (Metzgeria furcata)

Comments

Letheringsett

LetheringsettRook180122-1

Rook (Corvus fragilegus)

Comments

Walsey Hills

WalseyHillsMistleThrush180122-1

Mistle Thrush (Turdus viscivorus)

Comments

Cley

CleyLapwing170122-1

CleyLapwing170122-2

CleyLapwing170122-3

CleyLapwing170122-4

CleyLapwing170122-5

Midwinter flypast of the Lapwing (Vanellus vaniellus) flock

CleyRuff170122-1

Ruff (Philomachus pugnax)

CleyBrent170122-1

Brent (Branta bernicla)

CleyMarshHarrier170122-1

CleyMarshHarrier170122-2

CleyMarshHarrier170122-3

CleyMarshHarrier170122-4

CleyMarshHarrier170122-5

CleyMarshHarrier170122-6

CleyMarshHarrier170122-7

CleyMarshHarrier170122-8

Marsh Harrier (Circus aeruginosus)

Comments

Foxley Wood

FoxleyHazelGlueCrust150122-1

Hazel Glue (Hymenchoate ?)

FoxleyWoodSrpingHazelCup150221-1

FoxleySpringHazelCup150122-2

Spring Hazel Cup (Encoeia furfuracea)

FoxleyWrinkledCrust150122-1

Wrinkled Crust (Phlebia radiata)?

FoxleyToothed150122-1

FoxleyToothed150122-2

Oak Tooth Crust (Radulomyces molaris)

Thanks to Anne for the id.

FoxleyWButter150122-1

FoxleyWButter150122-2

Witch's Butter (Exidia glandulosa) with strange warty growths and Wood Bristle-moss (Orthotrichum affine)

The white warty lumps found by James were in fact determined by Tony L to be Heteromycophaga glandulosae – a Norfolk first.

From Tony L


Heteromycophaga glandulosae. A jelly fungus parasitic on Witches Butter Exidia glandulosa (another jelly fungus) spotted by James Emerson. Only described in 1997, it has only two records on the NBN Atlas (but has been recorded elsewhere). New to Norfolk. A number of fungi are parasitic on other fungi. Ochre Cushion Trichoderma pulvinatum is common on the underside of Birch Polypores Piptoporus betulinus but Tony Moverley found an old bracket in which another parasitic fungus, Melanospora lagenaria had grown on both the Piptoporus and the Trichoderma. M. lagenaria has been previously recorded twice in Norfolk but is surprisingly little recorded elsewhere in Britain.


FoxleyWoodCauliflower150122-1

Flat thing with tooth like structure?

Should have looked more closely at the moss on this one.

FoxleyWoodCups150122-1

Beautiful little Ascos - miniature turkey oak acorn cups.

From Yvonne


I got the tiny Ascos on the wood as a species of Hyaloscypha but couldn’t get any further - either the spores were the wrong size or the hairs the wrong length !

I lost my bit so couldn't do any further photography.

Apologies.

This in fact turned out to be

Lasiobelonium variegatum,
a small cup fungus on dead oak, was identified by Anne Crotty. There is one previous Norfolk record (Acle, 2015) but it is nationally rare with other records only from Cornwall and around Leicester.


FoxleyWoodDiscoSp150122-1

Yellow disco Sp?

This became

Sulphur Disco (Bisporella sulfurina)

FoxleyWoodFlatNeckers150122-1

Flat Neckera (Neckera complanata)

Not quite

This turned out to be

Blunt Feather-moss (Hommalia trichomanoides)

Thanks to Chris P for id correction.

FoxlleyWoodRloreus150122-1

Little Shaggy Moss (Rhytidiadelphus loreus)

FoxleyWoodUlottaSp150122-1

Crisped/Bruch's Pincushion (Ulotta Sp)

FoxleyWoodPcurvifolium150122-3

FoxleyWoodPcurvifolium150122-1

FoxleyWoodPcurvifolium150122-2

Leaves from Curved Silk-moss (Plagiothecium curvifolium)

Asymetrical leaves with the lovely curved edge on one side.

FoxleyWoodGlueCrust150122-1

Glue Crust Fungus (Hymenchoate corrugata)

FoxleyWoodNettedCrust150122-1

Netted Crust (Byssolmerulius corium)


FoxleyWoodProngs150122-1

FoxleyWoodProngs150122-2

FoxleyWoodProngs150122-3

FoxleyWoodProngs150122-4

Found on the underside of a Birch Polypore.

Growing on the Polypore. Growing on the Ochre Cushion. Growing on both. Actually an asexual part of the Ochre Cushion???

Awaiting possible confirmation.

from Tony L

The spiky fungus on the Piptoporus/Hypocrea is a Melanospora sp., almost certainly M. lagenaria (two previous Norfolk records). Ellis & Ellis Fungi on Miscellaneous Substrates give perithecia to 0.8mm diam and only slightly hairy; neck to 1.5mm long. Did anyone take a specimen to confirm? The only similar species (M. caprina) has a white wooly covering over the perithecia. E&E state that M. lagenaria is usually on Smoky Bracket & Turkeytail but I have found it on Polypore at Kelling Heath Holiday Park.

Further confirmed by Stewart



FoxleyWoodBracken150122-1

Camarographium stephensii on Bracken (Pteridium aquilinum)

Thanks to Stewart for id.

FoxleyWoodLvirgineum150122-1

Snowy Disco (Lachnum virgineum)

Three from an Ash tree

FoxleyWoodFungusSp150122-1

FoxleyWoodFungusSp150122-2

FoxleyWoodLichenSp150122-1

A lichen Sp deep in a cleft in the bark.

FoxlleyWoodLichenSp150122-1

Thanks Rob for showing me these. If you could let me know which is which it would be much appreciated.

Another fascinating day with the NFSG

Thank you all

Comments

Winterton

Winterton140122-1

WintertonDunes140122-1

WintertonDunes140122-2

WintertonGrass140122-1

WintertonHeather140122-1

WintertonOak140122-1

WintertonOak140122-2

WintertonOak140122-3

Stunted Oak (Quercus robur)

WintertonMarshHarrier140122-1

Marsh Harrier (Circus aeruginosus)

WintertonSEO140122-1

WintertonSEO140122-2

WintertonSEO140122-4

WintertonSEO140122-3

WintertonSEO140122-5

Sort Eared Owl - (Asio flammeus)

Like a tinted Woodcut in the evening light.

Comments

Deeping St James

DeepingStJamesLEO130122-1 1

DeepingStJamesLEO130122-2 1

DeepingStJamesLEO130122-3 1

Long Eared Owl (Asio otus)

DeepingStJamesHeron130122-1

Heron (Ardea cinerea)

Comments

Frampton Marsh

FramptonMarshStonechat130122-1

Stonechat (Saxicola rubicola)

FramptonMarshWhitefront13-122-1

FramptonMarshWhitefront13-122-2

FramptonMarshWhitefront13-122-3

FramptonMarshWhitefront13-122-4

White Fronted Goose (Anser albifrons)

FramptonMarshRBG130122-1 1

FramptonMarshRBG130122-5

FramptonMarshRBG130122-4

FramptonMarshRBG130122-3 1

Red-breasted Goose (Branta ruficollis)

Comments

Freiston Shore

FreistonSHore130122-1

FreistonSHore130122-2

FreistonShore130122-3

Comments

Cley

CleyBlackRedstart120122-1

CleyBlackRedstart120122-2

CleyBlackRedstart120122-3

CleyBlackRedstart120122-4

cleyBlackRedstart120122-5

Black Redstart ♀︎ (Phoenicurus ochruros)

CleyWaxwing120122-1

CleyWaxwing120122-2

CleyWaxwing120122-3

CleyWaxwing120122-5

CleyWaxwing120122-4

CleyWaxwing120122-6 1

CleyWaxwing120122-7

CleyWaxwing120122-8

CleyWaxwing120122-9

CleyWaxwing120122-13

CleyWaxwing120122-10

CleyWaxwing120122-11

Waxwing (Bombycill garrulus) Ad ♀︎

CleyPinkfeet120122-1

Pink-footed Goose (Anser brachyrhynchus)

Comments

Blakeney Freshes

BlakeneyFreshes120122-1

BlakeneyFreshes120122-2

BlakeneyFreshes120122-3

BlakeneyFreshes120122-4

BlakeneyFreshes120122-5

BlakeneyFreshes120122-6

Comments

Aylsham

AylshamBdichotomum090122-1

Bicoloured Bryum (Bryum dichotomum)

AylshamBunguiculata090122-1

Bird's-claw Beard-moss (Barbula unguiculata)

AylshamMarzipan100122-1

AylshamMarzipan090122-2

AylshamMarzipan90122-3

Winter Heliotrope (Petasite fragrans)

AylshamOanomalum090122-1

White-tipped bristle-moss (Orthotrichum anomalum) Capsules without calyptra)

AylshamOdiaphnaum090122-1

White-tipped Bristle-moss (Orthotrichum diaphanum showing capsules with calyptra and the 16 peristome teeth of old capsules

The white hairs and some capsules of Grey Cushion Moss (Grimmia pulmonata) can also be seen mixed in.

AylshamDalbicans100122-2

White Earwort (Diplophyllum albicans)

AylshamMossSp100122-1

AylshamMoss100122-2

Moss Sp?

AYLSHAMPRIMROSE090122-1

Primrose (Primula vulgaris)










Comments

Brett's Wood

Brett'sWoodOpulchellum090122-1

Elegant Bristle-moss (Orthotrichum pulchellum)

Brett'sWoodPformosum090122-1

Bank Haircap (Polytrichum formosum)

Brett\swoodLsemiteres090122-1

Brett'swoodLsemiteres090122-1 2

Southern Crestwort (Lophocolea semiteres)

Brett'sWoodRcomplanata090122-1

Even Scalewort (Radula complanata)

Brett'sWoodPnemorale090122-1

Brett'sWoodPnemorale090122-2 1

Juicy/Woodsy Silk-moss (Plagiothecium succulentum/nemorale)

Does this give enough information to discern which one. If so. Why?

Any help much appreciated.

Brett'sWoodOlineare090122-1

Cape Thread-moss (Orthodontium lineare) in the early stage of capsules forming. The capsules will eventually point down below the horizontal.
This sample was taken from top of the bark the colony was on.

Brett'sWoodFissidens090122-1

Brett'sWoodFissidens090122-2

Brett'sWoodFissidens090122-2 1

x100

Pocket-moss Sp (Fissidens Sp)

Slender Pocket-moss (Fissidens exilis)?

Not quite

Leaves definitely not slim enough.

Common Pocket-moss (Fissidens taxifolius)

Thanks to Sharon for asking me look again.

Brett'sWoodLheterophylla090122-1

An element of Variable-leaved Crestwort (Lophocolea heterophylla)

Brett'sWoodsSmokeyBracket090122-1

Brett'sWoodSmokeyBracket090122-2


BrettsWoodSmokeyBracket090122-3

Smokey Bracket (Bjerkandera adusta)

Brett'sWoodCrepidotusSp090122-1 1

Crepidotus Sp

WildStuff6283

This had globose spores with a spikey surface, which makes it likely to be Round Spored Oysterling (Crepidotus cesatii)

Comments

Cley

CleyAvocet060122-1

Avocet (Recurvirostra avocetta) basking in the sunshine,

CleyBrent060122-1

Three of the four youngsters in this family of Brent (Branta bernicla)

CleyBrent060122-2

Brent (Branta bernicla)

CleyBuzzard060122-1

CleyBuzzard080122-2

Common Buzzard (Buteo buteo)

CleyCormorant080122-1

Cormorant (Phlocracorax garbo) thought the reeds.

CleyReeds060122-2

Reeds (Phragmites communis)

CleyMeadowPipit080122-1

Meadow Pipit (Anthus pratensis)

CleyPinkfoot080122-1

CleyPinkfoot080122-2

CleyPinkfoot080122-3

CleyPinkfoot080122-4

Pink-footed Goose (Anser brachyrhynchus)

CleyReed080122-1

Common Reed (Phragmites communis)

CleySeal060122-1

CleySeal060122-3

CleySeal060122-4

CleySeal060122-5 1

Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus)

CleyShoveller060122-1

CleyShoveller080122-2

CleyShoveller080122-3

CleyShoveller080122-4

CleyShoveller080122-5

CleyShoveller080122-6

Shoveller (Anas clypeata) scattered by a passing Marsh Harrier

CleyStonechat080122-1


Stonechat (Saxicola rubicola)



Comments

Dersingham Bog

DersinghamBog030122-1

DersinghamBog030122-2

DersinghamBogDungBeetle030122-1

Dung Beetle

DersinghamBogDungFungus030122-1

Dung Fungus Sp

Turned out to be


Cow Pat Gem (Cheilymenia granulata)

Thanks to Mark Joy for id

DersinghamBogFungusJuicyLucy030122-1

Fungus Sp on Neat feather-moss (Pseudoscleropodium purum)

From Steve Judd

The small white things growing on moss happily allowed me to find plentiful spores to measure and lots of
hyphae with a complete absence of clamp connections leave me comfortable that I have Arrhenia retiruga - Small Moss Oysterling.

Small Moss Oysterling (Arrhenia retiruga)

DersinghamBogFungusSp030122-1

DersinghamBogFungusSp030122-2

DersinghamBogOrange150122-1

Fungus Sp

This one turned out to be Byssonectria terrestris

From

First Nature


Thanks to Mark Joy for id.

DersinghamBogFungusSp2030122-1

Young Fungus Sp?

DersinghamBogMelastizaSp030122-1

DersinghamBogMelastizaSp030122-2

DersinghamBogMelistizacornubiensis030122-1

Melastiza contorta

DersinghamBogOrangeCup030122-1

DersinghamBogOrangeCup030122-2

Orange Cup Sp?

from

Steve Judd

Now to the less certain, the little orange cup jobbies: If you want to read the full process of the addled mind of a confused very amateur mycologist read on otherwise skip to the end. These little orange jobbies were a real challenge. I started with microscopy so that I knew the spore size, shape, surface and contents as well as what the paraphyses looked like before working through the Fungi of temperate Europe book looking for something similar. The paraphyses fitted nicely to the Melastiza family the spore size fitted Melastiza cornubiensis although the fruiting body didn't look right and the spores lacked reticulations, I considered M. flavorubens as that has warts on the spores rather than reticulations but no these really are smooth. Not a Melastiza so on to Octospora as the spore shape was right but far too small. Some of the Anthrocobia looked really promising in both spore shape, size and even the paraphyses looked close, the downside being thatAnthrocobia only grow on recent fire sites and there really wasn't any evidence of a recent burn. I worked through the good old faithful Peter Thompson rechecking everything that I had already lookedat and adding many more including a few absurd ideas out of desperation such as Cheilymenia vitellina which had the right sized spores but wrong habitat. Then after what felt like may hours of poring throughthe pages, out of the book leapt the perfect answer, spore size well within range, the book described perfectly the hairs on the outer surface, the fungi grow individually or in small groups on soil under deciduous trees, sandy soil, heathland, grassland and under bracken. This one has been recorded once in Norfolk identified by Tony Leach at Beeston Regis Common, I am going to have to check with Tony but in the mean time I am going to tentatively suggest Pseudaleuria fibrillosa. Of course I am very open to the likelihood that I am completely wrong and will be very interested to hear what you folks come up
with from your findings and research.




Pseudaleuria fibrillosaParaphyses01

Pseudaleuria fibrillosaSpores02

Pseudaleuria fibrillosaSpores01

Pseudaleuria fibrillosaParaphyses32

This was later confirmed by Tony

The full deliberations from Steve

I have a tentative ID that I would greatly appreciate your thoughts on.
Gill and I went to Dersingham bog to meet up with Mike and Mark for a walk. Whilst there Gill found some small, bright orange yellow 1-1.5cm cups growing singly and in small groups on the sandy soil on the higher heath type ground amongst the moss. These had a look of Melastiza without the black edge hairs although this family was probably what sprang to mind having just been looking at the M. contorta.
I took one home for further examination and below are my observations and thoughts:
I started with a close examination under the stereo microscope, internally they were very little different under the stereo than seen by the naked eye, the outer infertile surface was more interesting with apparent hairs more prolific nearer the rim, some paler and some darker but none that were actually black.
Moving to microscopy to get the spore size, shape, surface and contents as well as seeing what the paraphyses looked like.
Spores (14) 15-17 (18) x 7- 8 (9) µm smooth with an apparent thick wall evident in those showing contents, but without any obvious surface ornamentation. Having examined with water I then tried again this time using Meltzer's, again with disclosing solution and finally with Lactophenol cotton blue to be sure that they really were smooth, which they were even at x1000.
Paraphyses were long slender with a very swollen tip and a yellow contents when viewed in water. The paraphyses and asci showed no reaction to Iodine.
Confident that it wasn't anything that I recognised I then worked through the books (Fungi of temperate Europe, Fungi of Switzerland vol 1 and Peter Thompson Ascomycetes) looking for something similar.
My deliberations:
The paraphyses fitted nicely to the Melastiza family but none of them were right for various reasons. I considered Octospora as the spore shape was right but wrong size. Some of the Anthrocobia looked really promising in both spore shape, size and even the paraphyses looked close, the downside being that Anthrocobia appear to only grow on recent fire sites and there really wasn't any evidence of a recent burn. I continued through the books rechecking everything that I had already looked at and adding many more less likely ideas out of desperation such as Cheilymenia vitellina which had the right sized spores but wrong habitat.
Going again through Peter Thompson I noticed
Pseudaleuria fibrillosa which wasn't in any of the other books. Working through the description the spore size was within range, the description of paraphyses seemed right, the book described perfectly the hairs on the outer surface, the fungi growing individually or in small groups on soil under deciduous trees, sandy soil, heathland, grassland and under bracken. Looking this one up on the internet I found very little apart from an article on "The occurrence of Pseudaleuria fibrillosa in Sicily" My Italian is non existent but the photos in the document showed spores and paraphyses that were a perfect match to what I had photographed through the microscope, leaving me feeling relatively comfortable with my ID.
Of course the next thing I did was check the Norfolk Mycota to discover that it has only been recorded once in Norfolk identified by yourself at Beeston Regis Common, seeing as it was that uncommon my confidence in my ID rapidly diminished. I am very open to the likelihood that I am completely wrong and will be very interested to hear what you think. I have attached a few photographs of the fruiting body in situ and our microscopy images.
Many thanks for reading through all this.




Pseudaleria fibrillosa


DersinghamBogYellowlegBonnet030122-1

DersinghamBogYellowlegBonnet030122-2

Yellowleg Bonnet (Mycena epipterygia)

This is has an extremely sticky characteristic. It's very difficult to put down once picked up.

You can see the stickiness on the stype.





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Martham

MarthamCommonCrane030122-1

CommonCrane (Grus grus)

MarthamCattleEgret030122-1

MarthamCattleEgret030122-5

MarthamCattleEgret030122-3

MarthamCattleEgret030122-2

MarthamCattleEgret030122-4

Cattle Egret (Bubulcus ibis) through the reeds.


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Hickling

Hickling010122-1

Hickling010122-2

Hickling010122-3

HicklingRobin010122-1

Robin (Erithacus rubecula)

HicklingStonechat010122-1

Stonechat (Saxicola rubicola)

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